PENT Program, Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Education Integrated Program

The Faculty of Education is seeking qualified sessional instructors to teach the following three-credit hour courses on the  Brandon University Campus for the 2020 PENT (Program for the Education of Native Teachers) schedule during the timeframe April 6-July 23, 2020. For all courses, applicants should hold a minimum of a Master’s degree. For education courses (prefix 01, 02, 03, 04), applicants should qualify for a Manitoba teaching certificate, have a good understanding of the Manitoba school curriculum, and have successful teaching experience. The course offerings and tentative schedule are as follows:

 

02:459 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS(MY)
April 6 – 30, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course is an introduction to the methods, materials, and rationale for English Language Arts in the Middle Years classroom. It covers the development of literacy, the influence of outside school experiences on language acquisition and development, the role of linguistics, the inter-relationship of the six areas of English Language Arts, organization and development of an effective educational experience for young adolescents and an overview of useful teaching practices and methodology ranging from direct instruction to whole language.

68:152 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE STUDIES II
April 6 – 30, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the area of Native Studies. Native Studies II is an overview of modern Aboriginal writing, drama, art, film making, philosophy and cosmologies. Although some attention will be paid to the influence of traditional art forms and ceremonies, the emphasis will be on contemporary works.

68:261 CANADIAN ABORIGINAL ART
April 6 – 30, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course provides an introduction to Canadian Aboriginal art and art history, focusing on the geographical regions and cultural areas of the Northeast, Sub-arctic, northern Plains, Northwest Coast, and the Arctic. The art forms of each region will be examined in terms of cultural meaning, aesthetic form, and historical context, as well as museum collection and arts patronage by non-cultural survival and present day identity.

99:090 FUNDAMENTALS OF UNIVERSITY
April 6 – 30, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course is intended for students who lack the necessary academic skills for university success. Topics covered include: university expectations, library resources, how to analyze information for relevance and accuracy, how to summarize and cite information appropriately, effective academic computing skills, and self-regulation strategies including time management. Regular short assignments will give students the opportunity to improve their reading comprehension, vocabulary and writing skills throughout the course. This elective is limited to students who have completed less than 30 credit hours. Students are strongly advised to take 99:175 after successful completion of this course.

68:375 INDIGENOUS METHODOLOGIES
April 6 – 30, 2020 (1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)

The critique of Western research methodologies has been an important part of the decolonization project of Native Studies for some time. The role of imperialism in shaping these methodologies, and their impact on indigenous peoples, has been documented and continues to be studied. In recent years this work has been complemented by the development of indigenous research methodologies. We examine a few of these in this course, discussing their significance and value. We also explore several broader issues, such as the ethics of research involving indigenous peoples and some of the distinctive features of indigenous-centered research. Students will have the opportunity to select and evaluate a research project that makes some attempt to structure itself in a culturally-informed and appropriate manner.

02:210 TEACHER IDENTITY: BECOMING TOMORROW’S TEACHER
April 6 – 30, 2020 (5:00 – 7:30 p.m.)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to reflect on their identity as a beginning teacher. As part of the course, students will examine their own learning experiences and develop a deeper understanding of themselves as learners.

03:351 INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS (EY-MY)
April 6 – 30, 2020 (5:00 – 7:30 p.m.)

This is an introductory methods course designed to develop the skills and strategies used to teach all subjects in the Early and Middle years. It includes the application of writing objectives, questioning strategies, and reaching closure to both lessons and units of instruction. The practical application of instructional methods to classroom situations will be an integral part of the course.

54:365 CANADA FROM WORLD WAR II TO THE PRESENT
April 6 – 30, 2020 (5:00 – 7:30 p.m.)

A study of the history of Canada from 1939 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the economic and social developments in different regions of the country, on French-English relationships, and on Canada-U.S.A. relationships.

03:250 POWER, POSITIONALITY, AND PRIVILEDGE: SCHOOLS AS COMPLEX SPACES
May 4 – 28, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to reflect on issues related to power, privilege and positionality within educational spaces. As part of the course, students will consider relationships in the classroom and the role of ethical decision-making in education.

15:151 THE BIOLOGY OF LIFE
May 4 – 28, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course is intended for students interested in biological principles wishing to meet the Natural Sciences requirement but who will not pursue a major or minor in Biology. This course provides a basic essential background of biological principles and emphasizes topics in cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It focuses on processes that are basic to the understanding of the biology of living things. This course cannot count toward a major or minor in Biology or as a prerequisite for further Biology courses except for 15:152 Biological Diversity.

68:273 ORAL NARRATIVES
May 4 – 28, 2020 (1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)

A survey of the oral tradition of cultural communication. Emphasis will be placed on the role of oral narrative in traditional society, the difference between myth and legend and the function of songs. Trickster cycles and the role of the trickster will be emphasized with particular reference to modern myths and the role of oral narrative in contemporary Native society.

62:091 MATH CORE MATHEMATICS
May 4 – June 11, 2020 (5:00 – 8:00 p.m.)

This course is intended for students who are conscious of deficiencies in their mathematical training and who wish an opportunity to remedy these before enrolling in other courses in the life, earth and social sciences or elementary education. Topics studied include a review of basic arithmetic, basic algebra, basic geometry, graphs and elementary statistics.

62:171 MATH INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
May 4 – June 11, 2020 (5:00 – 8:00 p.m.)

Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, mean, variance, the normal distribution, probability theory, populations and samples, sampling distributions. Introduction to estimation and tests of hypotheses and simple linear regression.

03.354 SCIENCE METHODS (MY)
June 1 – 25, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This course deals with the philosophy, content and teaching methods of the Manitoba Middle Years Science curriculum. Innovative ways of having Middle Years students interact with science concepts are an integral part of the course.

38:179 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
June 1 – 25, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

Provides an introduction to the field of Regional Geography and its concepts. Aims at introducing students to a basic regional framework of the world. Focuses on the major politico-economic realms of the world — their present structure and problems.

38:282 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
June 1 – 25, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)           

The learned and shared concepts and behaviours that constitute culture influence virtually everything people think and do. Cultural geography is the study of spatial variations among culture groups and the interactions of those same groups with the physical environment. It is often organized around five themes. These are culture region, cultural diffusion, cultural ecology, cultural integration and cultural landscape. This course examines each of these themes as they relate to one or more dimensions of culture such as ethnicity, language, religion and settlement

54:155 CANADA TO CONFEDERATION
June 1 – 25, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)           

A survey of the history of the peoples of the northern half of North America until Canadian Confederation.

42:160 INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCE
June 1 – 25, 2020 (1:30 –4:00 p.m.)           

An introduction to the materials forming and the processes shaping the earth’s surface. The topics covered will include: minerals and rocks; rock structure; earthquakes and volcanic activity; continental drift and plate tectonics; weathering of rocks; and erosion, transport, and deposition by running water, ice, wind, and sea.

68:250 ABORIGINAL WOMEN WRITERS
June 1 – 25, 2020 (1:30 –4:00 p.m.)

Some of the most striking contemporary literature in North America today is that written by Aboriginal women. This course examines the antecedents and influence of the major Aboriginal women writers. Writers whose work will be studied include Paula Gunn Allen, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Lucy Tapahonso, among others.

12:153 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
June 1 – 25, 2020 (5:00 – 7:30 p.m.)

Socio-cultural anthropology focuses on the local and global cultural dynamics and factors that influence the ways that human beings construct, conduct and understand their lives. This course establishes the history and development of anthropology as a discipline, and discusses socio-cultural fieldwork methods. The course then provides an overview of anthropological studies, analysis and explanations concerning patterns and changes in human behaviour in the areas of gender, family, religion, economy, politics, and social inequality and conflict.

02:477 SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS (MY)
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

Social Studies has a mandate to prepare young people for active and responsible citizenship. This course will examine the Social Studies from grades five to eight. Both the content of the curriculum and the anticipated student response to it will be considered. Activities to promote a growth of appreciation for Social Studies will be emphasized.

12:270 APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

The development, theory, methods and approaches of applied or practical socio-cultural anthropology, including the historical development of applied anthropology, the ethical dilemmas of applied fieldwork and the research methods used in such field work. Topics include program planning, needs assessment, social impact, assessment, evaluative research, community development, advocacy, and policy research.

30:145 ENGL CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

This survey introduces students to a rich variety of fiction, poetry, and drama in English, with focus on particular nations or cultural themes. Each section of the course is unique and is designed for students to learn the vocabulary of literary studies. The course emphasizes writing skills, with at least three essay assignments, and students will receive help, wherever needed, in planning, developing, and writing effective essays.

68:151 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE STUDIES I
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (9:00 – 11:30 a.m.)

A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the area of Native Studies. Native Studies I covers the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian Government, including Treaties, the Indian Act, Reserve systems, political and constitutional questions, family issues, education, health care, economic development, the justice system and land claims.

02:355 ART METHODS (EY-MY)
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)

This course will be focused upon hands-on art activities reflecting suitable curricula for Early and Middle Years students. The integration of subjects through visual arts as well as child development through art will be studied. A familiarity with current Manitoba Early and Middle Years art curricula will be gained.

38:180 PEOPLE AND PLACES: AN INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
June 29 – July 23,2020 (1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)

We are all curious about lands other than our own and people other than ourselves. Human Geography helps us to understand why Canada is different from other parts of the world, and why Canadians differ from other groups of people. It does this by looking at the evolution and present status of the humanly occupied earth.

68:361 INDIGENOUS CONTRIBUTIONS TO HEALTH AND HEALING
June 29 – July 23, 2020 (1:30 – 4:00 p.m.)

A scholarly investigation of the contributions Indigenous peoples from North America have made informing today’s health care practices and healing approaches. This course focuses on Indigenous epistemologies and worldviews about health and healing. Students will apply course content and guest lecture content towards Indigenizing helping approaches.

 

Start Date:                              as scheduled

Salary:                                      $6,205/3 credit hour course

Application deadline:      January 22, 2020

 

 

Interested educators are invited to submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, course evaluations or other evidence of teaching success, and the names of three referees in a single pdf file to:

John Minshull, Director
PENT Program
Brandon University
Email: minshullj@brandonu.ca

 

Brandon University is committed to equity, welcomes diversity, and hires on the basis of merit.  All qualified individuals who may contribute to the diversification of the University, especially women, persons with disabilities, Indigenous persons, racialized persons, and persons of all sexual orientations and genders are encouraged to apply.  Canadian citizens and permanent residents are given priority.  Evidence of citizenship must be provided.

We are committed to providing an inclusive and barrier-free work environment.  This starts with the hiring process.  If you require an accommodation during any phase of the evaluation process, please indicate it in your cover letter.  All information received related to an accommodation is kept confidential.  To ensure this employment opportunity is accessible to all interested individuals, this posting is available in an alternate format upon request.

DATE ISSUED: January 14, 2020