Interned Japanese-Canadian to Speak on Human Rights

October 10, 2014

BRANDON, MB – A tireless national advocate for human rights will be speaking at Brandon University later this month, about being displaced from his home and interned by the Canadian government during World War ll.

Art Miki (web)Art Miki is a Winnipeg activist, educator, and former president of the National Association of Japanese Canadians. He played a lead role in negotiating a formal apology from the Canadian government and compensation for property that was confiscated in the 1940s during the internment of 22,000 Japanese-Canadians.

During the war, Miki and his family were forced from their fruit farm near Vancouver and relocated to a one-room house in Ste. Agathe, MB which they shared with other families.

“Mr. Miki has dedicated a considerable portion of his life to increasing awareness of human rights issues,” says Dr. Rhonda Hinther, Associate Professor in BU’s Department of History. “His efforts have created a greater understanding between peoples and we are excited that he will spend some time at the University relating his experiences.”

The public is invited to hear Miki on Tuesday, October 14 at 1:45 pm in Clark Hall, Room 302, as he explores themes of wartime internment in Canada, the US, and Britain.

“Brandon University has a long history of social justice exemplified by notable alumni including Tommy Douglas and Stanley Knowles,” says Dr. Heather Duncan, acting Vice-President (Academic and Provost). “We are pleased to offer students and community members the opportunity to engage in living history with Mr. Miki.”

Brandon University, founded in 1899, promotes excellence in teaching, research, and scholarship; educating students so that they can make a meaningful difference as engaged citizens and leaders.

-30-

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Rhonda Hinther
Department of History
204-727-7421
hintherr@brandonu.ca

Glen Kirby
Communications Officer
204-727-9762
kirbyg@brandonu.ca